10 Most Expensive Places to Live in the World

It appears that favored living includes some major disadvantages (who’d have thought it) and if you need to live in the absolute most attractive places on the planet, at that point you will need to hack up some truly truckloads of money for it. Yes, we are listing 10 most expensive cities in the world.

1. Singapore

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It’s the world’s only island city-state, while holding the third most elevated GDP per capita and reliably positioning very in education, healthcare, life expectancy, quality of life, personal safety, and housing. A bottle of 750ml wine will, however, set you back at the rate $23.68 (£18.70) so shabby pre-drinks are completely not feasible.

2. Hong Kong

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Hong Kong is famous for having absurdly costly housing costs while being inconceivably competitive because of wast population. The city has a high density of skyscrapers and boasts the second biggest number of high rises of any city on the planet.

3. Zürich

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Zürich is the most expensive place to live in Europe. It is mostly positioned as a city with one of the “best qualities of life” on the planet while additionally being the most “liveable city”, yet clearly a McDonalds will set you back about $15 (£11.90), so you know, swings and roundabouts.

4. Tokyo

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It is a home to 51 of the Fortune Global 500 companies, the most astounding number of any city on the planet, while the Michelin Guide has granted Tokyo the most Michelin stars of any city on the planet so at any rate, you’ll get a good food, regardless of the possibility that it may cost you dearly.

5. Osaka

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Osaka is the second biggest metropolitan region in Japan and has more than 19 million occupants, with its cityscape being depicted as “only surpassed by Tokyo as a showcase of the Japanese urban phenomenon.” Fuel, taxi charges, lodgings, liquor and espresso are for the most part especially costly here.

6. Seoul

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It’s tied with Singapore as the most costly city for purchasing garments and is famously dear for meals costing a normal of $13 (£10.30) for a 1kg chunk of bread – which ought to debilitate anybody from ever eating it again.

7. Geneva

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Geneva has the third-most astounding quality of any city on the planet (behind Vienna and Zürich) and is regularly positioned as world’s most liveable city. The cost of renting a house in Geneva is higher than in New York or Paris and twice as much as in Amsterdam or Brussels.

8. Paris

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A deep history, Paris is as yet one of Europe’s major centers of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts, and is one of the world’s top tourist destinations. It gloats comparable costs to London, with a brew costing around €6 (£5.30) and a dinner for two of every a normal eatery setting you back about €60 (£52.95).

9. New York

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The lease represents around 69% of occupant’s month to month costs which is to some degree the motivation behind why it has moved to number 9 on the list of the world’s most costly cities, after dropping to 22 in 2015. The normal cost of a 1kg chunk of bread is $7.95 (£6.30).

10. Copenhagen

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It is a bustling city with a good quality life and with a populace of around 2 million, it is fundamentally smaller than huge numbers of the urban areas on this list. Terrible news for you espresso fans, however, a normal cappuccino costs about €6 (£5.30).


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