Forcan Ridge, Glen Shiel

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Glen Shiel is a glen in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland. The Glen runs approximately 9 miles from south-east to north-west, from the Cluanie Inn (216 metres) at the western end of Loch Cluanie and the start of Glenmoriston to sea level at the village of Shiel Bridge and Loch Duich.

Dalbeg beach, Outer Hebrides

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A beautiful spot, hidden from the road with a lovely loch full of birdlife and summer water lilies. This is a small sheltered sandy beach with high cliffs on either side. It is a good place for families.

The Storr, Isle of Skye.

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The Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland. The Storr is a prime example of the Trotternish landslip, the longest such feature in Great Britain. This has a number of weirdly shaped rock pinnacles, the remnants of ancient landslips.

Glencoe Lochan

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Glencoe Lochan is a tract of forest located just north of Glencoe village in the Scottish Highlands. It was planted/transplanted from the Pacific Northwest of Canada in the nineteenth century. The lochan is currently under the care of the Forestry Commission.

Hushinish, Isle of Harris

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Hushinish is a remote place on the west coast of Harris in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The name Hushinish is derived from Old Norse and means “house headland”.

Sannox, Isle of Arran

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Sannox is a village on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. Sannox sits on the east coast of the Isle of Arran, with a stunning backdrop of scenery in the shape of Glen Sannox.

The Standing Stones of Callanish, Isle of Lewis

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The Callanish Stones are an arrangement of standing stones placed in a cruciform pattern with a central stone circle. They were erected in the late Neolithic era. According to one tradition, the Callanish Stones were petrified giants who would not convert to Christianity in 17th century.

Loch Linnhe, Argyll

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Loch Linnhe is a sea loch on the west coast of Scotland. The part upstream of Corran is known in Gaelic as A Linne Dhubh and downstream as A Linne Sheileach. The name Linnhe is derived from the Gaelic word linne, meaning “pool”.

Ayton, Scottish Borders

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Ayton is a small village located in the historic county of Berwickshire, today part of the Scottish Borders region. Ayton means ‘Eye-town’. It contains the former ancient tollbooth or town hall with a clock tower, a large branch of the Royal Bank of Scotland and a shop

Bow Fiddle Rock, Portknockie

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Portknockie is a coastal village on the Moray Firth within Moray, Scotland. The village was founded in 1677 and it became a significant herring fishing port during the 19th century. A popular site in Portknockie is Bow Fiddle Rock, a large rock about 50 feet high just off the coast.

The Quirang, Isle of Skye

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The Quiraing is awesome. It is supernatural. It is a place of wonder and amazement. It is outstanding by any measure. If you are fit enough to walk the narrow path and scramble up and down the steep slopes – you must do it. To visit Skye without experiencing the Quiraing seems unthinkable.

Loch Cluanie, Northwest Highlands

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Loch Cluanie is a loch in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland at the south-east end of Glen Shiel. It is a reservoir, contained behind the Cluanie Dam, constructed in 1957 as part of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board’s Glenmoriston project to generate hydroelectricity.

Eilean Donan Castle, Kyle of Lochalsh

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Eilean Donan Castle is one of the most recognised castles in Scotland and probably appears on more shortbread tins and calendars than any other. It is, without a doubt, a Scottish icon and certainly one of the most popular visitor attractions in the Highlands.

South Queensferry, West Lothian

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Queensferry, also called South Queensferry or simply “The Ferry”, is a town to the west of Edinburgh, Scotland, traditionally a royal burgh of West Lothian. It lies some ten miles to the north-west of Edinburgh city centre, on the shore of the Firth of Forth between the Forth Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge.

Mullach Clach a’Bhlair from Glen Feshie

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Mullach Clach a’Bhlair has an insignificant summit towards the southern end of the great plateau that stretches northwards to Sgor Gaoith and eastwards to Cairn Toul. Its finest features are seen on the approach from beautifully-wooded Glen Feshie, with Coire Garbhlach.

Stac Pollaidh, Northwest Highlands

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Stac Pollaidh is a mountain in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland. The peak displays a rocky crest of Torridonian sandstone, with many pinnacles and steep gullies. The peak is named on the first edition Ordnance Survey maps simply as “An Stac” (the pinnacle) and on later maps as “Stac Polly”.

Loch Torridon, Wester Ross

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Loch Torridon is a sea loch on the west coast of Scotland in the Northwest Highlands. The loch was created by glacial processes.  It has two sections: Upper Loch Torridon to landward, east of Rubha na h-Airde Ghlaise, at which point it joins Loch Sheildaig; and the main western section of Loch Torridon proper.

Borve, Isle of Lewis

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Borve is a village on the west side of the Isle of Lewis in Scotland.The village lies on the River Borve, which is crossed by two adjacent bridges. The older bridge, built of stone rubble and consisting of a single arch, dates from the late 19th century and is no longer used for road traffic.

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